How to Write an Argument Essay:

When writing an argument essay, it is important to remember that you are not just arguing your personal opinion but also you are supporting your argument with credible sources. An argument is only worth making if you support it. It’s easy to argue without substantiated support, but to make your argument valid, supporting it with quotations, statistics, and other data can help persuade your audience. In other words, you will most likely need to find sources if you don’t already have them. This is called the info-gathering stage of your writing process.

 of How to Write an Argumentative Essay was reviewed by  on December 4, 2014.

It’s such an important skill that I’ve blogged about writing an argumentative essay until I am blue in the face. (My face now matches the Kibin logo, that’s how blue it is!) I’ve written about , , and .


How to Write an Argumentatice Essay in 9 Steps:

How to Write an Argumentative Essay Step by Step:

Hi, I am writing an argumentative essay on freedom of speech rights and the 1st amendment and I have two sides of the argument. I am for freedom of speech if it doesn’t harm other people and I have some cases where the supreme court are avoiding the laws stated in the amendment but I’m on the court’s side of restricting inappropriate speech in a school environment. How should I start out my argument?


An argumentative essay is one that focuses on supporting one side of an argument. When a writer decides to write an argumentative essay, it is advisable that they weigh both sides' arguments carefully before picking a side to support. Being able to understand and support one side makes it easier to write an argumentative essay. A well structured essay will clearly bring out the arguments needed to convince a reader. It is these arguments and stands that make argumentative essays the most interesting to read.A common method for writing an argumentative essay is the five-paragraph approach. This is, however, by no means the only formula for writing such essays. If it sounds straightforward, that is because it is; in fact, the method consists of (a) an introductory paragraph (b) three evidentiary body paragraphs that may include discussion of opposing views and (c) a conclusion.One stylistic point: it is probably more true of the argumentative essay than it is of the other kinds of essays that we must be very careful of transitions, the devices we use to move from one point to another, to hold ideas together for comparison's sake, to create and organize landmarks along the path of our thinking. Before writing an argumentative essay, it might be a good idea to review the section on . (Later, we will see transitional devices at work in a sample argumentative essay.)Typically, you *won’t use first-person “I” when writing an argumentative essay (unless your teacher is asking for you to share *your opinion about an issue from a personal perspective). You can learn more about first-person and third-person academic writing in these articles: